Summer Safety: Safe Teen Driving

Driving is something that requires a lot of focused attention and consideration for others that are on the road with you. As technology continues to improve to help make life easier in many ways, the potential for distractions while driving has increased, especially with the use of smartphones and younger drivers.

Safe driving is something that everybody should practice (as there are drivers of all ages and levels of experience on the road) but it’s the younger drivers that should really take heed to establishing safe practices from the start. As the parent of a teen driver it’s important to provide them with all of the right tools and educational resources to keep them as safe and aware as possible. Here are some great tips to consider when it comes to your teen driving:

• Don’t allow your teen to drive non-family members: just one non-family member increases teen’s risk of a crash increases by 44 percent. Many states have graduated licenses that don’t allow passengers for six months, but experts say six months isn’t nearly long enough, and parents should extend the rule.

• Turn off cell phone notifications. (Avoid all distracted driving!)

• Cell phones should only be used for navigation, and only in a dashboard dock, at eye level.

• For at least the first six months (and longer if parents think it’s necessary), teens shouldn’t drive between the hours of 9 p.m. and 5 a.m.

• Utilize as many vehicle safety features as possible, such as: automated brakes, forward-collision warning and lane departure systems, and airbags.

• Involve yourself in your teen’s driving education: ask questions about their choices and actions on the road, supervise them, and ensure they practice driving in many types of conditions. (Julia Eddington, quoted.thezebra.com)

Here at Palladium we go beyond just finding the perfect coverage to meet your needs, we want to make your life as comfortable and safe for everyone as possible. Learn more about our auto insurance products here, and let us earn your trust.